Memorializing John Hunt Morgan & the 1863 Ohio-Indiana Raid

With Jim Blount, Hamilton Historian; Lester Horwitz and David L. Mowery, independent scholars; G. Michael Pratt, Professor of Anthropology, Miami University; Matthew Smith, Colligan History Project (moderator).

Tuesday, October 7, 2014, 7.30 pm

Harry T. Wilks Conference Center, Miami University Hamilton

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John Hunt Morgan

The Colligan’s new season “Hard Road to Liberty: Ohio and the Civil War got off to a flying start last Tuesday, with Kelli Johnson’s innovative and gripping discussion, The Fight Against Slavery: Lessons From History to a packed-out audience at Miami Hamilton’s Downtown Center! On October 7, the Colligan returns to the Wilks Conference Center for a round-table discussion on the legacy of John Hunt Morgan.

The John Hunt Morgan Heritage Trail memorializing the route of Confederate General Morgan and his “Raiders” in July of 1863 features markers at 56 sites in Ohio alone, connecting with trails in Indiana and Kentucky. A panel of Civil War experts explores the making of this trail, its sponsors, and how the only Civil War action on Ohio soil is remembered today.

  • Free public event. Reception to follow.
  • Conferral of a special Jim Blount History Educator Award upon Richard O Jones

 

Butler Co. Historical Society: Distinguished Educator Award

20140313mainlogo1Folks: Do you know a person or group who has made a significant contribution to interpreting local history, preserving our historical heritage, or increasing public historical understanding? If so, the Butler County Historical Society invites you to nominate them for the Distinguished Historian Award.

This award will be given at the Annual Meeting and Banquet of the Butler County Historical Society, November 20, 2014 to recognize those who clearly demonstrate either a distinguished pattern of achievement over time or a particular accomplishment of high merit enhancing public understanding of the history of Butler County, Ohio. Previous recipients of “Historian of the Year” are eligible for this award, along with any worthy individuals who have not previously been recognized by an award.

For details on submitting nominations by the deadline at 4 pm on October 14, 2014, see poster below.

BCHS Release

Celebrating Caroline Scott Harrison

Dear folks,

Caroline Scott Harrison

Caroline Scott Harrison

Sunday October 5 marks the Second Caroline Scott Harrison Day, celebrating the life of US First Lady and alumna of Oxford Female Institute, Caroline Scott Harrison (1832-1892). Learn about plans for a bronze statue of Caroline on the grounds of OCAC, while enjoying cake and cider and the chance to win great door prizes at this Open House celebration. Oxford Community Arts Center, 10 S. College Avenue, Oxford, Ohio, 10/5/2014, 3-5 pm.

Click for poster

The Fight Against Slavery: Lessons From History

Kelli Lyon Johnson, Miami University Hamilton, English

Tuesday, September 16 @ 7pm

Miami Hamilton Downtown, 221 Robinson-Schwenn Bldg

kelli-lyon-johnsonHailed as the first human rights movement, the fight for abolition of slavery and the slave trade is an inspiration for freedom struggles today and relevant to the fight to eliminate slavery and human trafficking in the 21st century. Because slavery and trafficking are now illegal in every country, the continuing battle for human freedom can no longer focus solely on abolition.

UntitledThis event is presented in cooperation with the Department of Justice and Community Studies and Criminal Justice Week, which this year focuses on the issues of slavery and human trafficking. Kelli has curated an exhibition on display at Miami Hamilton Downtown through September: “If I got a chance to talk to the World”: Stories of Modern Day Slavery. This exhibition presents stories told by survivors of modern-day slavery, showcasing the stories of those often described as “silent” or “invisible.”

  • Free public event and exhibition. Reception to follow.

Harriet Beecher Stowe

hbstoweDear folks: on Wednesday, September 24 at 7pm, Whitney Womack Smith (Miami University Hamilton) will speak on Harriet Beecher Stowe. Her talk explores gender politics in 19th century women’s abolitionist work and in Stowe’s bestselling anti-slavery novel, Uncle Tom’s Cabin. (Stowe’s connections to Oxford will be revealed!)

Call 523-3035 for more information. This event is at Lane Public Libraries Meeting Room, 15 South College Ave, Oxford, and is co-sponsored by Smith Library of Regional History and Western College Alumnae Association.

Click below for flier.

Harriet Beecher Stowe Poster (1)

Announcing Our Fall 2014 Schedule!

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Ohioan, Union General, Ulysses S. Grant

The Michael J. Colligan History Project proudly announces our new schedule of events, part of the series Hard Road to Liberty: Ohio & the Civil War. This fall sees an exciting line-up, including a panel discussion marking the 150th anniversary of the death of John Hunt Morgan, the “Thunderbolt of the Confederacy,” whose 1863 raid brought the Civil War to southwest Ohio, and live music by Jay Ungar and Molly Mason, whose “Ashokan Farewell” hauntingly accompanied Ken Burn’s documentary The Civil War (this event is co-sponsored by Miami Regionals Artist Series). And this October we will be honoring renowned Civil War historian James M. McPherson (Battle Cry of Freedom) with the 2014 John E. Dolibois History Prize.

Join us Tuesday September 16 for our opening event of this season, as Kelli Lyon Johnson (Miami University Hamilton) explores the “Fight Against Slavery: Lessons From History.”  This event is presented in co-operation with the Department of Justice and Community Studies, and Criminal Justice Week.

Click below for schedule poster!!!

Fall Colligan Schedule

Remembering World War One

world_war_1_recruiting_posterToday is the 100th anniversary of the beginning of the First World War, a conflict which began in an obscure corner of Europe, claiming over 16 million lives by its end some four years later.

On July 28, 1914 the Austro-Hungarian Empire declared war on Serbia, citing Serbian involvement in the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand the previous month. Ethnic nationalism, dynastic rivalry, and divisive alliances triggered a wave of hostilities, leaving almost the whole of Europe in a state of war within a few short weeks.

In the United States, many observers saw the Great War as an old world family quarrel. In 1916, Woodrow Wilson won a second term in the White House under the slogan, “He kept us out of the War.” This boast proved short-lived. The United State’s April 1917 entry into the war – the result of indiscriminate German submarine attacks in the Atlantic – was decisive, but wide swathes of public opinion questioned what had been billed as a “Crusade for Democracy.” In 1919, Congress vetoed the Treaty of Versailles over its inclusion of the League of Nations Charter (the forerunner of the United Nations). Wary of future foreign entanglements, America’s gaze shifted inwards, but the rise of totalitarianism in Europe and Asia brought isolationism to an end.

The last US veteran of World War One, Frank Woodruff Buckles, died in 2011. An NBC news profile, made shortly before his death, is below: